Shirley Hills
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Vision, mission, synergy, and faith are all vital traits of churches that go beyond a religious organization to a focused community of believers making an impact in their community. From time to time, we need to be reminded of what God has called us to do and be for His glory. Plan to join us each week of August as we recast a vision for Shirley Hills to fulfill its kingdom potential as we love God and each other, grow in community as disciples, and send each of our“Paul’s letter to the Colossians is a great call to the church to rise to the life to which God has called us to live…”members to missional lives in the world.

Vision, mission, synergy, and faith are all vital traits of churches that go beyond a religious organization to a focused community of believers making an impact in their community. From time to time, we need to be reminded of what God has called us to do and be for His glory. Plan to join us each week of August as we recast a vision for Shirley Hills to fulfill its kingdom potential as we love God and each other, grow in community as disciples, and send each of our“Paul’s letter to the Colossians is a great call to the church to rise to the life to which God has called us to live…”members to missional lives in the world.

The Holy Spirit is maybe the most mysterious and misunderstood member of the Divine person, but understanding the role the Spirit plays in the life of the believer is crucial for us becoming all that God desires for us to be. He works in us to help us grow in Christ and He works through us as we go to the world for the glory and kingdom of God. Join us during these summer weeks as we study in depth how the Holy Spirit leads the church in “growing and going.”

The Holy Spirit is maybe the most mysterious and misunderstood member of the Divine person, but understanding the role the Spirit plays in the life of the believer is crucial for us becoming all that God desires for us to be. He works in us to help us grow in Christ and He works through us as we go to the world for the glory and kingdom of God. Join us during these summer weeks as we study in depth how the Holy Spirit leads the church in “growing and going.”

The Book of 1 John is a brief but important letter in the Bible, especially for those who struggle with doubt concerning their salvation. John writes so each of us can have confidence that we are - in fact - children of God in Christ, so we may know we belong to Him, so we can once and for all rest “assured.”

The Book of 1 John is a brief but important letter in the Bible, especially for those who struggle with doubt concerning their salvation. John writes so each of us can have confidence that we are - in fact - children of God in Christ, so we may know we belong to Him, so we can once and for all rest “assured.”

We talk and sing much of being “saved by grace” in our churches today - and rightly so. Grace, though, is not just meant for that moment of salvation when we become Christ’s disciple. It is God’s plan that His grace also daily work in our lives to transform us into the people that God calls us to be in the world.

We talk and sing much of being “saved by grace” in our churches today - and rightly so. Grace, though, is not just meant for that moment of salvation when we become Christ’s disciple. It is God’s plan that His grace also daily work in our lives to transform us into the people that God calls us to be in the world.

 
Easter is not the final amazing event of a great story. It is the beginning of a greater story and the promise of a new life for all of us in Jesus Christ. When Jesus came out of the grave, his words, “follow me,” took on more meaning and significance than ever. We are called to be his disciples (his followers) and, not only receive the life and salvation he has offered, but let that life and salvation affect every facet of our lives.

Easter is not the final amazing event of a great story. It is the beginning of a greater story and the promise of a new life for all of us in Jesus Christ. When Jesus came out of the grave, his words, “follow me,” took on more meaning and significance than ever. We are called to be his disciples (his followers) and, not only receive the life and salvation he has offered, but let that life and salvation affect every facet of our lives.

 
New year’s resolutions are always popular this time of year. Less eating, more exercise, less TV, more reading, less work, more family are all popular things to pledge our commitment to in the new year. While all these are good, sometimes the one thing we miss is that our relationship with Jesus should be the primary means for evaluating last year and setting goals for this year. We are called above all things to grow as the people of God, rooted deeply in the Word and bearing the fruit of the Spirit in our lives to the glory of God. If SHBC committed together to “bearing fruit,” we would - more than ever before – truly be able to see God’s glory and see what happens when his people grow.

New year’s resolutions are always popular this time of year. Less eating, more exercise, less TV, more reading, less work, more family are all popular things to pledge our commitment to in the new year. While all these are good, sometimes the one thing we miss is that our relationship with Jesus should be the primary means for evaluating last year and setting goals for this year. We are called above all things to grow as the people of God, rooted deeply in the Word and bearing the fruit of the Spirit in our lives to the glory of God. If SHBC committed together to “bearing fruit,” we would - more than ever before – truly be able to see God’s glory and see what happens when his people grow.

Hope seems to be something of a missing ingredient today. In its place we find an abundance of pessimism, cynicism, anger, and despair, leaving us to wonder if there truly is hope to be found and experienced in our lives and for our world. Still, the story of Christmas quietly reminds us that hope is less of a thing to desperately chase and more of a person to be trusted with all the moments of our lives. Jesus was the hope that had been prophesied, the hope that was promised, and the hope that was personified as God became man so man could again know God. It is in remembering his story, singing his songs, and rejoicing in his promises that brings us what this world cannot offer – a true and lasting hope.

Hope seems to be something of a missing ingredient today. In its place we find an abundance of pessimism, cynicism, anger, and despair, leaving us to wonder if there truly is hope to be found and experienced in our lives and for our world. Still, the story of Christmas quietly reminds us that hope is less of a thing to desperately chase and more of a person to be trusted with all the moments of our lives. Jesus was the hope that had been prophesied, the hope that was promised, and the hope that was personified as God became man so man could again know God. It is in remembering his story, singing his songs, and rejoicing in his promises that brings us what this world cannot offer – a true and lasting hope.

Romans 12 is one of the great chapters for defining the life to which a follower of Christ has been called. As opposed to the culture’s constant refrain to live for ourselves, Christ calls us to sacrificial living – giving our lives completely for the sake of Christ and His kingdom. In this study of Paul’s writing, we will see our identity, our mindset, our purpose, and the code by which we live is not like the world around us. We are called to something other, something greater, something “different.”

Romans 12 is one of the great chapters for defining the life to which a follower of Christ has been called. As opposed to the culture’s constant refrain to live for ourselves, Christ calls us to sacrificial living – giving our lives completely for the sake of Christ and His kingdom. In this study of Paul’s writing, we will see our identity, our mindset, our purpose, and the code by which we live is not like the world around us. We are called to something other, something greater, something “different.”

 
We’ve probably all heard the popular slogan of a credit card company, “membership has its privileges.” Church membership on the other hand is less about privilege and a lot more about responsibility. It calls us to be committed to something outside of ourselves, bigger than ourselves; it calls us to grow more deeply in relationship with Christ and with other disciples; it calls us to radical acts of service; it calls us to be on mission for God, both individually and corporately; it calls us to share the love and joy of Christ together as we complete his task. All that responsibility can seem daunting, but the greatest privilege in the world to be called God’s children and to be on mission as His people. In spite of her flaws and frailties, the church is at the very heart of Jesus and his one and only plan for the spread of the gospel and growth of the kingdom in the world. That is why we truly believe “membership matters.”

We’ve probably all heard the popular slogan of a credit card company, “membership has its privileges.” Church membership on the other hand is less about privilege and a lot more about responsibility. It calls us to be committed to something outside of ourselves, bigger than ourselves; it calls us to grow more deeply in relationship with Christ and with other disciples; it calls us to radical acts of service; it calls us to be on mission for God, both individually and corporately; it calls us to share the love and joy of Christ together as we complete his task. All that responsibility can seem daunting, but the greatest privilege in the world to be called God’s children and to be on mission as His people. In spite of her flaws and frailties, the church is at the very heart of Jesus and his one and only plan for the spread of the gospel and growth of the kingdom in the world. That is why we truly believe “membership matters.”

“This summer at “The Hills,” two message series will make up our summer study together. We will hear the voices of minor prophets, reminding us that God is faithful even when we are unfaithful to him and he calls us continually to “return” to find his grace and mercy. Once we come back him, we can then hear the voice of Jesus in John 15, calling us to “remain,” to abide in him as branches of the vine, bearing fruit as we grow in him. From the prophets who declare that there is “no fruit on the vines” when we are out of fellowship with God to Jesus who declares that we will bear the fruit of the vine as we abide in him, let us all as Gods people learn to “Return and Remain.”

“This summer at “The Hills,” two message series will make up our summer study together. We will hear the voices of minor prophets, reminding us that God is faithful even when we are unfaithful to him and he calls us continually to “return” to find his grace and mercy. Once we come back him, we can then hear the voice of Jesus in John 15, calling us to “remain,” to abide in him as branches of the vine, bearing fruit as we grow in him. From the prophets who declare that there is “no fruit on the vines” when we are out of fellowship with God to Jesus who declares that we will bear the fruit of the vine as we abide in him, let us all as Gods people learn to “Return and Remain.”

 
“It is finished” is one of Christ’s last recorded statements from the cross before his death. However, it is far from the last thing he said while on earth, for he was raised again to life and had much to say to those who were witnesses to his victorious resurrection. In these “conversations from beyond the grave,” Jesus speaks of all that He accomplished for us in His life, death, and resurrection, calling us to now live in his completed work and complete the work to which he has called us – a work that began in all that Christ “finished.”

“It is finished” is one of Christ’s last recorded statements from the cross before his death. However, it is far from the last thing he said while on earth, for he was raised again to life and had much to say to those who were witnesses to his victorious resurrection. In these “conversations from beyond the grave,” Jesus speaks of all that He accomplished for us in His life, death, and resurrection, calling us to now live in his completed work and complete the work to which he has called us – a work that began in all that Christ “finished.”

 
Paul’s letter to the Colossians is a great call to the church to rise to the life to which God has called us to live. The basis for Paul’s instruction is the centrality of Christ in God’s eternal plan and in our own hearts. Who Christ is and what He has done continually calls us to “higher living” - setting our minds on the things of God, giving ourselves to his agenda and mission, and prioritizing His work within us and through us. This is the call to truly find what is possible when we once and for all put Christ “First.”

Paul’s letter to the Colossians is a great call to the church to rise to the life to which God has called us to live. The basis for Paul’s instruction is the centrality of Christ in God’s eternal plan and in our own hearts. Who Christ is and what He has done continually calls us to “higher living” - setting our minds on the things of God, giving ourselves to his agenda and mission, and prioritizing His work within us and through us. This is the call to truly find what is possible when we once and for all put Christ “First.”

The story of Abraham in Genesis is a well-known account of a life marked by faith. There were ups and downs, victories and failures along the way; but it was a life called by God away from the old and forward to all that he had prepared for Abraham to be and do. That same call comes to us today- to step out in faith, to embrace the call of God for us, and to move toward the goal ahead. Join us during these weeks as Pastor Jacob leads us in a study of Abraham’s life and a vision for SHBC as we in faith move “forward.”

The story of Abraham in Genesis is a well-known account of a life marked by faith. There were ups and downs, victories and failures along the way; but it was a life called by God away from the old and forward to all that he had prepared for Abraham to be and do. That same call comes to us today- to step out in faith, to embrace the call of God for us, and to move toward the goal ahead. Join us during these weeks as Pastor Jacob leads us in a study of Abraham’s life and a vision for SHBC as we in faith move “forward.”

 
“This summer at “The Hills,” two message series will make up our summer study together. We will hear the voices of minor prophets, reminding us that God is faithful even when we are unfaithful to him and he calls us continually to “return” to find his grace and mercy. Once we come back him, we can then hear the voice of Jesus in John 15, calling us to “remain,” to abide in him as branches of the vine, bearing fruit as we grow in him. From the prophets who declare that there is “no fruit on the vines” when we are out of fellowship with God to Jesus who declares that we will bear the fruit of the vine as we abide in him, let us all as Gods people learn to “Return and Remain.”

“This summer at “The Hills,” two message series will make up our summer study together. We will hear the voices of minor prophets, reminding us that God is faithful even when we are unfaithful to him and he calls us continually to “return” to find his grace and mercy. Once we come back him, we can then hear the voice of Jesus in John 15, calling us to “remain,” to abide in him as branches of the vine, bearing fruit as we grow in him. From the prophets who declare that there is “no fruit on the vines” when we are out of fellowship with God to Jesus who declares that we will bear the fruit of the vine as we abide in him, let us all as Gods people learn to “Return and Remain.”